January52014

Here I have displayed a few of the images that have contributed to my study into mould. The different shapes of the mould are very interesting and have contributed greatly to my success in mimicking it.

December12013

Here I have displayed my Jiang Pengyi response photographs before they were edited. 

November172013

Brick Lane Street Art Tour-

I feel that this is both relevant to my theme of ‘urban decay’ and also lends itself to my Ricki Mountain responses due to the mixed media pieces and the rough, abstract styles of the work. 

October292013

Karen Margolis creates beautiful, mixed media pieces of work focusing on what thoughts and emotions might look like inside the human mind. Although the actual meaning behind the pieces is focused on thoughts and emotions, I feel that the results reflect urban decay very successfully and have inspired me to create similar pieces to mimic mold. I also feel that I could incorporate some of the ideas from this into my Ricki Mountain responses.

October202013

Here I have displayed some of the progress when creating my lino print edits.

October162013

Here I have displayed my unedited scans of brusho mixed with watered down pva in order to create a rusty effect.

October62013

Here, photographer Judith Burrows displayed her abstract prints of London. I feel that there are elements of decay due to the over exaggerated dark tones of the piece that reflect a mold like growth on the work looking as though it will slowly consume the entirety of the piece reflecting the theme of urban decay successfully. 

October52013

Here I have displayed my progress throughout creating rust like pieces using watered down PVA glue mixed with brusho poured onto a sheet of acetate.

October12013
destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned Family Doctors / Clinic. Germany
captain_crabs:


http://imgur.com/a/ZA08T#0

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned Family Doctors / Clinic. Germany

captain_crabs:

(via angrynerdyblogger)

September302013
4AM

Here I have displayed my unedited observational urban decay photography.

4AM

Here I have displayed the best of my observational photographs before they were edited. 

September182013

Here I have displayed my original scanograms before they were edited. I was very pleased with the original outcome due to the murky, dusty toned down effect that was created due to the light seeping under the black paper that was place above the objects.

September102013

I have been researching into Daniele Del Nero’s series of works named ‘After Effects’. Del Nero has created these beautiful pieces using black paper covered with flour and mould. This has inspired me greatly in terms of my Jiang Pengyi response as I have started to consider using real mould on my piece instead of trying to create an artificial decay.

September32013
Mat Urbecks photograph analysis history in full
St Gerard’s Orthopaedic Hospital (also used for the treatment of TB) was part of Father Hudson’s Society buildings across the UK. It provided services for locals and the neighbouring boys school, along with care for orphaned children of early to mid 1900’s.The Birmingham Diocesan Rescue Society for the protection of homeless and friendless catholic children was established in 1902 with Father Hudson as its first secretary and administrator. Father Hudson remained in Coleshill from 1898 until 1934. During that time the work of the Rescue Society grew, in particular the children’s homes. Its expansion included St. Vincent’s, a home for working boys in Moseley Road Birmingham, St. Edwards Boys Home, St George’s and St. James’ Cottage Homes for boys and St Gerard’s hospital for children in Coleshill.St. Gerard’s was the result of Father Hudson’s vision for a purpose built infirmary, not just for the boys of St. Edwards but for those from all catholic homes in the diocese and the catholic children from the workhouse hospitals.Two new schools were established in Coleshill through the Society. Father Hudson’s devotion to the children, his patience, energy and great administrative skills guided this development and the Rescue Society became known colloquially as Father Hudson’s Homes…Whilst plans were being made for a National Health Service there was considerable anxiety about the future of St. Gerard’s hospital. When the 1948 National Health act was passed the Regional Board agreed to pay hospital expenses and the hospital undertook to take patients according to their disability, not their religion.The chain of society buildings started to close in the 1980’s, due to changes in NHS funding and how orphaned children were dealt with as a whole. St Gerard’s closed in 1988.
Photograph from here:http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/asylums-hospitals/78969-father-hudson-society-st-gerards-hospital-birmingham-march-13-a.html
Information from here:http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/asylums-hospitals/78208-st-gerards-orthopaedic-hospital-coleshill-warwickshire-january-2013-a.html

Mat Urbecks photograph analysis history in full

St Gerard’s Orthopaedic Hospital (also used for the treatment of TB) was part of Father Hudson’s Society buildings across the UK. 
It provided services for locals and the neighbouring boys school, along with care for orphaned children of early to mid 1900’s.

The Birmingham Diocesan Rescue Society for the protection of homeless and friendless catholic children was established in 1902 with Father Hudson as its first secretary and administrator. Father Hudson remained in Coleshill from 1898 until 1934. During that time the work of the Rescue Society grew, in particular the children’s homes. 
Its expansion included St. Vincent’s, a home for working boys in Moseley Road Birmingham, St. Edwards Boys Home, St George’s and St. James’ Cottage Homes for boys and St Gerard’s hospital for children in Coleshill.
St. Gerard’s was the result of Father Hudson’s vision for a purpose built infirmary, not just for the boys of St. Edwards but for those from all catholic homes in the diocese and the catholic children from the workhouse hospitals.
Two new schools were established in Coleshill through the Society. 
Father Hudson’s devotion to the children, his patience, energy and great administrative skills guided this development and the Rescue Society became known colloquially as Father Hudson’s Homes…

Whilst plans were being made for a National Health Service there was considerable anxiety about the future of St. Gerard’s hospital. 
When the 1948 National Health act was passed the Regional Board agreed to pay hospital expenses and the hospital undertook to take patients according to their disability, not their religion.

The chain of society buildings started to close in the 1980’s, due to changes in NHS funding and how orphaned children were dealt with as a whole. 

St Gerard’s closed in 1988.

Photograph from here:http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/asylums-hospitals/78969-father-hudson-society-st-gerards-hospital-birmingham-march-13-a.html

Information from here:http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/asylums-hospitals/78208-st-gerards-orthopaedic-hospital-coleshill-warwickshire-january-2013-a.html

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